Chapter 17 - Surgical Diseases
Modern Surgery
Inflammation
Suppuration and Abscess
Mortification
Pyaemia
Ulceration and Ulcers
Boils
Carbuncle
Malignant Pustule
Burns and Scalds
Frost Bite
Chilblains
Mechanical,Injuries
Septic Wounds
Incised Wounds
Rules for Examining and Dressing Wounds
Antiseptic Dressings
Way Wounds Unite
Punctured Wounds
Lacerated Wounds
Granulation and Scarification
Gunshot Wounds
Poisoned Wounds
Fractures
Way Broken Bones Unite
Dislocations
Different Diseases of Bones
Pereostitis
Necrosis
Coxalgia
White Swelling
Bunions
Whitlow
Stiff Joint
Tumors
Cancer
Polypus
Piles
Wens
Aneurisms
Bronchocele
Water in the Scrotum
Blood in the Scrotum
Phlebitis
Varicose Veins
Hernia
Varicocele
Deformities and Irritations of the Spine
Wry Neck
Foreign Bodies in the Eye
Stye
Inflammation of the Edge of the Eyelids
Disorder of the Lashes
Ptosis
Chronic Inflammation of the Lachrymal Sac
Opthalmia
Inflammation of the Cornea
Inflammation of the Iris
Weakness of Sight
Imperfect Vision
Short and Long Sight
Squinting
Affections of the Ear
Inflammation of the Meatus
Wax in the Ear
Earache
Inflammation of the Tympanum, Deafness
Bleeding from the Nose
Ingrowing Toe Nail
Chafing and Excoriation
Foreign Substances
Bleeding from Wounds
Proud Flesh
Ambrine
Compression of Arteries to Stop the Flow of Blood
Anesthetics
Care of the Teeth
Rotting of the Teeth
Tooth-Ache
Filling Teeth
The First Teeth
Cleaning the Teeth
Ulcer of the Stomach
Glanders
X-Ray
Radium
Trachoma
Arterio-Sclerosis
Flatfoot
Riggs' Disease
Bandages

17.16 Rules for Examining and Dressing Wounds

Useful Rules for Examining and Dressing Wounds.

NEVER give the patient more pain from the mole of handling and dressing the wound than is necessary for his present good or future safety. Never distress him by probing, squeezing, etc., to find things that will be of no use when learned.
Make all examinations as soon after the accident as possible; for before inflammation and swelling take place, the probe or finger inflicts much less pain.
In changing the dressing of a wound, let all the fresh ones be ready before the removing of the old. The sponge, warm water, adhesive plaster, lint, ointment, lotions, bandages, etc., should all be at hand, and not have to be looked after when the wound is exposed.
Put the patient in the most easy position, that he may not be needlessly fatigued during the dressing.
If the bandage, plaster, and other dressings, have become hard, and glued together, and to the skin, by blood or matter, soften them with warm boiled water, which is to be pressed out of a sponge, a basin being held below the part to catch the water as it falls from the dressing.
The strips of adhesive plaster are to be removed by pulling gently at one end, and then the other, each to be drawn towards the wound, so as not to pull its lips apart.
In large wounds, take off one, or at most, two strips of plaster at a time. Cleanse, wipe dry, and again support this part of the wound with new strips of plaster, before any more are taken off. This will prevent the wound being torn open by the weight of its parts.
If the wound be large and deep, its sides should be supported by an assistant while changing the dressings.
If there are several wounds, dress but one at a time, that there may be no needless exposure to the air.
Pay the utmost attention to cleanliness, asepsis and dryness.
The frequency of the dressing must depend on the amount and quality of the discharge, the situation of the injury, the climate and season of the year, the effect produced by the dressing, and by the feelings of the patient.
Remember that the one great desideratum is to keep away all germs from the wound and its vicinity.

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