Chapter 17 - Surgical Diseases
Modern Surgery
Inflammation
Suppuration and Abscess
Mortification
Pyaemia
Ulceration and Ulcers
Boils
Carbuncle
Malignant Pustule
Burns and Scalds
Frost Bite
Chilblains
Mechanical,Injuries
Septic Wounds
Incised Wounds
Rules for Examining and Dressing Wounds
Antiseptic Dressings
Way Wounds Unite
Punctured Wounds
Lacerated Wounds
Granulation and Scarification
Gunshot Wounds
Poisoned Wounds
Fractures
Way Broken Bones Unite
Dislocations
Different Diseases of Bones
Pereostitis
Necrosis
Coxalgia
White Swelling
Bunions
Whitlow
Stiff Joint
Tumors
Cancer
Polypus
Piles
Wens
Aneurisms
Bronchocele
Water in the Scrotum
Blood in the Scrotum
Phlebitis
Varicose Veins
Hernia
Varicocele
Deformities and Irritations of the Spine
Wry Neck
Foreign Bodies in the Eye
Stye
Inflammation of the Edge of the Eyelids
Disorder of the Lashes
Ptosis
Chronic Inflammation of the Lachrymal Sac
Opthalmia
Inflammation of the Cornea
Inflammation of the Iris
Weakness of Sight
Imperfect Vision
Short and Long Sight
Squinting
Affections of the Ear
Inflammation of the Meatus
Wax in the Ear
Earache
Inflammation of the Tympanum, Deafness
Bleeding from the Nose
Ingrowing Toe Nail
Chafing and Excoriation
Foreign Substances
Bleeding from Wounds
Proud Flesh
Ambrine
Compression of Arteries to Stop the Flow of Blood
Anesthetics
Care of the Teeth
Rotting of the Teeth
Tooth-Ache
Filling Teeth
The First Teeth
Cleaning the Teeth
Ulcer of the Stomach
Glanders
X-Ray
Radium
Trachoma
Arterio-Sclerosis
Flatfoot
Riggs' Disease
Bandages

17.49 Wry Neck

Wry Neck. Torticollis.

IN this complaint, the head is drawn over towards one of the shoulders, with the face generally turned towards the opposite side. This is caused by the rigid contraction of a particular muscle. In some instances, however, other muscles are affected, and the head may be drawn in other directions, or be twitched about in various ways.
I had a singular case from New Hampshire, which, though not exactly wry neck, was a kindred disease, and is worthy of being mentioned. The subject of it was a young lady of good physical development, but inclined to nervous complaints. Her head was chiefly drawn over backwards, sometimes so as to lie for a short time flat upon the back, with no power to raise it. She was obliged, ordinarily, to let her head lean a; little to one side, and rest upon the hand, in order to keep it steady. When walking, with the head erect, without this support, it was every few moments jerked over backward and a little to one side, the chin being thrown up in a most unseemly way. The case partook of the nature of chorea.

Treatment. For the genuine wry neck, where the muscle which draws the head to one side is rigid and inflamed, the treatment should consist of heat, poultices, purgatives, friction and alteratives. When the muscles causing the distortion are not rigid, electro magnetism, or the shower bath, may have a good effect. In some cases, strychnine will do well.
The peculiar case mentioned above completely recovered, under the use of the extract of St. Ignatius' bean (95), one pill three times a day, and gradually increased to nine pills a day. She also took iron, and was put upon a most energetic system of out door exercise. Considering the stubborn and severe nature of the complaint, her complete recovery was as unexpected to her friends as it was gratifying. As the majority of wry neck cases are due to muscular contraction of a rheumatic type, the remedies employed for that disease should be used here. In all cases the hot applications should not be lost sight of.

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