Chapter 17 - Surgical Diseases
Modern Surgery
Inflammation
Suppuration and Abscess
Mortification
Pyaemia
Ulceration and Ulcers
Boils
Carbuncle
Malignant Pustule
Burns and Scalds
Frost Bite
Chilblains
Mechanical,Injuries
Septic Wounds
Incised Wounds
Rules for Examining and Dressing Wounds
Antiseptic Dressings
Way Wounds Unite
Punctured Wounds
Lacerated Wounds
Granulation and Scarification
Gunshot Wounds
Poisoned Wounds
Fractures
Way Broken Bones Unite
Dislocations
Different Diseases of Bones
Pereostitis
Necrosis
Coxalgia
White Swelling
Bunions
Whitlow
Stiff Joint
Tumors
Cancer
Polypus
Piles
Wens
Aneurisms
Bronchocele
Water in the Scrotum
Blood in the Scrotum
Phlebitis
Varicose Veins
Hernia
Varicocele
Deformities and Irritations of the Spine
Wry Neck
Foreign Bodies in the Eye
Stye
Inflammation of the Edge of the Eyelids
Disorder of the Lashes
Ptosis
Chronic Inflammation of the Lachrymal Sac
Opthalmia
Inflammation of the Cornea
Inflammation of the Iris
Weakness of Sight
Imperfect Vision
Short and Long Sight
Squinting
Affections of the Ear
Inflammation of the Meatus
Wax in the Ear
Earache
Inflammation of the Tympanum, Deafness
Bleeding from the Nose
Ingrowing Toe Nail
Chafing and Excoriation
Foreign Substances
Bleeding from Wounds
Proud Flesh
Ambrine
Compression of Arteries to Stop the Flow of Blood
Anesthetics
Care of the Teeth
Rotting of the Teeth
Tooth-Ache
Filling Teeth
The First Teeth
Cleaning the Teeth
Ulcer of the Stomach
Glanders
X-Ray
Radium
Trachoma
Arterio-Sclerosis
Flatfoot
Riggs' Disease
Bandages

17.60 Imperfect Vision

Imperfect Vision. Amaurosis.

THE complaint here referred to is dependent on some change in the optic nerve or the brain, most commonly the former.

Symptoms. In some cases the sight becomes suddenly dim, and is perhaps soon lost altogether; but more often it is impaired 'by slow degrees, being only defective at intervals. as when the stomach is out of order, or the eyes have been fatigued. At one time, it will begin with objects appearing dim; at another, with their being double; at still another, with the ability to see only one half of objects. In some instances, the complaint begins with a crooked or disfigured or discolored appearance of things looked at. Again it will begin as near sightedness, or far sightedness; or the patient cannot measure distances, and will miss his aim in pouring water into a glass, or in putting a match to the wick of a lamp. The flame of a lamp will appear split. At times the eye does not bear light, at other times it longs for it, and objects do not appear illuminated enough.

Distinction. Amaurosis may be distinguished from cataract by there being no opaque body to be seen behind the pupil; and by the light of a candle appearing discolored, split, or lengthened, or iridescent; whereas in cataract vision is only clouded, and a lighted candle looks as if surrounded with a mist.

Chances of Cure. These are generally not very favorable, unless the remedies employed very soon produce good effects.

Treatment. Electro galvanism is one of the most promising remedies. Bayberry, root, dried and reduced to an impalpable powder, and taken as a snuff, is occasionally useful. Cayenne, steeped in water, one grain to one ounce of water, and a little of it dropped into the eye, may stimulate the palsied nerve, and in some cases restore sight.
But probably nothing will do better than cold bathing, a shower bath if it can be borne, out door exercise vigorously pursued, and an adherence for a long time perhaps a year to a strictly vegetable diet, at the same time using nervine tonics, etc. (316).

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