Chapter 17 - Surgical Diseases
Modern Surgery
Inflammation
Suppuration and Abscess
Mortification
Pyaemia
Ulceration and Ulcers
Boils
Carbuncle
Malignant Pustule
Burns and Scalds
Frost Bite
Chilblains
Mechanical,Injuries
Septic Wounds
Incised Wounds
Rules for Examining and Dressing Wounds
Antiseptic Dressings
Way Wounds Unite
Punctured Wounds
Lacerated Wounds
Granulation and Scarification
Gunshot Wounds
Poisoned Wounds
Fractures
Way Broken Bones Unite
Dislocations
Different Diseases of Bones
Pereostitis
Necrosis
Coxalgia
White Swelling
Bunions
Whitlow
Stiff Joint
Tumors
Cancer
Polypus
Piles
Wens
Aneurisms
Bronchocele
Water in the Scrotum
Blood in the Scrotum
Phlebitis
Varicose Veins
Hernia
Varicocele
Deformities and Irritations of the Spine
Wry Neck
Foreign Bodies in the Eye
Stye
Inflammation of the Edge of the Eyelids
Disorder of the Lashes
Ptosis
Chronic Inflammation of the Lachrymal Sac
Opthalmia
Inflammation of the Cornea
Inflammation of the Iris
Weakness of Sight
Imperfect Vision
Short and Long Sight
Squinting
Affections of the Ear
Inflammation of the Meatus
Wax in the Ear
Earache
Inflammation of the Tympanum, Deafness
Bleeding from the Nose
Ingrowing Toe Nail
Chafing and Excoriation
Foreign Substances
Bleeding from Wounds
Proud Flesh
Ambrine
Compression of Arteries to Stop the Flow of Blood
Anesthetics
Care of the Teeth
Rotting of the Teeth
Tooth-Ache
Filling Teeth
The First Teeth
Cleaning the Teeth
Ulcer of the Stomach
Glanders
X-Ray
Radium
Trachoma
Arterio-Sclerosis
Flatfoot
Riggs' Disease
Bandages

17.69 Ingrowing Toe Nail

Ingrowing Toe Nail.

To most persons, the above words will suggest some unpleasant associations, for there are few but have had some painful experience with this affection. It is usually, like corns and some other troublesome things, the penalty inflicted for wearing tight shoes. It generally appears upon the great toe. The constant pressure of a narrow boot or shoe against the side of the toe, causes the edge of the nail to sink into the flesh, producing inflammation and pain, and finally ulceration. Nature, attempting to repair the mischief, sends out granulations, which, being perpetually irritated, shoot up into unhealthy growths, cared proud flesh. Thenceforward, the sufferings of the patient become incessant; and he cannot now even compromise, as he would be glad to do, by putting on shoes of ample dimensions, but is obliged to negotiate a peace by putting away the shoe altogether, or by cutting a bole through it to take off the pressure. At the risk of giving the reader a few dismal twinges every time he looks upon this page, we place here, in Fig. 186, a good representation of this tormenting disorder, as a suit. able warning against the folly of giving the toes narrow quarters.


Treatment.
When the disorder begins to make its appearance, it is a good plan to scrape the nail very thin on top; this will cause it to grow upon the upper surface, and to give way at the tender part, so as to obviate, sometimes, the necessity of any other treatment.
The following is the best treatment. Wash the toe in warm water, and make the parts dry with cotton wool. Then gently press cotton wool in between the toe nail and the tender projecting flesh, and extend it along the groove back between the skin and nail. Next, wet the end of a piece of nitrate of silver, and rub it thoroughly upon the nail, close to the cotton, not allowing it to touch the tender flesh; then put on a thin layer of cotton wool, and, in two or three hours, a poultice around the toe.
In two days, the nail will be perfectly black, and, as far as the nitrate was well applied, will be separated from the parts underneath, and may be taken off without pain.
If the nail is very thick, scrap off the black and deadened part in two days, and apply the nitrate again. This treatment is a vast improvement on the old and cruel practice of tearing off the live nail

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