Chapter 17 - Surgical Diseases
Modern Surgery
Inflammation
Suppuration and Abscess
Mortification
Pyaemia
Ulceration and Ulcers
Boils
Carbuncle
Malignant Pustule
Burns and Scalds
Frost Bite
Chilblains
Mechanical,Injuries
Septic Wounds
Incised Wounds
Rules for Examining and Dressing Wounds
Antiseptic Dressings
Way Wounds Unite
Punctured Wounds
Lacerated Wounds
Granulation and Scarification
Gunshot Wounds
Poisoned Wounds
Fractures
Way Broken Bones Unite
Dislocations
Different Diseases of Bones
Pereostitis
Necrosis
Coxalgia
White Swelling
Bunions
Whitlow
Stiff Joint
Tumors
Cancer
Polypus
Piles
Wens
Aneurisms
Bronchocele
Water in the Scrotum
Blood in the Scrotum
Phlebitis
Varicose Veins
Hernia
Varicocele
Deformities and Irritations of the Spine
Wry Neck
Foreign Bodies in the Eye
Stye
Inflammation of the Edge of the Eyelids
Disorder of the Lashes
Ptosis
Chronic Inflammation of the Lachrymal Sac
Opthalmia
Inflammation of the Cornea
Inflammation of the Iris
Weakness of Sight
Imperfect Vision
Short and Long Sight
Squinting
Affections of the Ear
Inflammation of the Meatus
Wax in the Ear
Earache
Inflammation of the Tympanum, Deafness
Bleeding from the Nose
Ingrowing Toe Nail
Chafing and Excoriation
Foreign Substances
Bleeding from Wounds
Proud Flesh
Ambrine
Compression of Arteries to Stop the Flow of Blood
Anesthetics
Care of the Teeth
Rotting of the Teeth
Tooth-Ache
Filling Teeth
The First Teeth
Cleaning the Teeth
Ulcer of the Stomach
Glanders
X-Ray
Radium
Trachoma
Arterio-Sclerosis
Flatfoot
Riggs' Disease
Bandages

17.75 Compression of Arteries to Stop the Flow of Blood

COMPRESSION Of arteries may be done by direct pressure of thumb or finger, or some object such as a key or piece of wood answering the same purpose. Better still, in places where it may be used is the tourniquet which is the name given the appliance whether made of a piece of string or more elaborately made of rubber or manufactured webbing (see Figure A). The object is to shut off the supply of blood from the heart and the point chosen is nearest the surface where compression may be applied and as fax from the heart as possible.

The temporal artery may be felt and secured just in front of the upper inner attachment of the ear to the head (see Figure B).


The sub clavian artery, just above the collar bone along the outer half before it is attached to the shoulder blade as in Figure C.
The brachial artery, at the middle of the upper arm at the under side of the biceps muscle
The ulna artery, out of the front of the wrist just inside the ulna bone, which is the one on the little finger side (palm upwards).

The radial pulse, the most accessible vessel in the body, is on the outer or radial or thumb side of the wrist between the prominent muscle tendon and the radial bone.

The femoral is at the extreme upper inner corner of the thigh.

The popliteal is at the under surface of the bend of the knee.
Figures D, E, F, G, and H show different kinds of tourniquets and how used; figure D, for example, shows a tourniquet made by folding a handkerchief and tying it into a knot, the knot being placed over the artery, the handkerchief tied around the limb and then twisted as in cut. This presses the knot against the artery and stops the flow of blood. Figure E shows the band tourniquet; F the screw tourniquet applied; G and H show the improvised tourniquet applied to the arm or thigh.



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