Chapter 17 - Surgical Diseases
Modern Surgery
Inflammation
Suppuration and Abscess
Mortification
Pyaemia
Ulceration and Ulcers
Boils
Carbuncle
Malignant Pustule
Burns and Scalds
Frost Bite
Chilblains
Mechanical,Injuries
Septic Wounds
Incised Wounds
Rules for Examining and Dressing Wounds
Antiseptic Dressings
Way Wounds Unite
Punctured Wounds
Lacerated Wounds
Granulation and Scarification
Gunshot Wounds
Poisoned Wounds
Fractures
Way Broken Bones Unite
Dislocations
Different Diseases of Bones
Pereostitis
Necrosis
Coxalgia
White Swelling
Bunions
Whitlow
Stiff Joint
Tumors
Cancer
Polypus
Piles
Wens
Aneurisms
Bronchocele
Water in the Scrotum
Blood in the Scrotum
Phlebitis
Varicose Veins
Hernia
Varicocele
Deformities and Irritations of the Spine
Wry Neck
Foreign Bodies in the Eye
Stye
Inflammation of the Edge of the Eyelids
Disorder of the Lashes
Ptosis
Chronic Inflammation of the Lachrymal Sac
Opthalmia
Inflammation of the Cornea
Inflammation of the Iris
Weakness of Sight
Imperfect Vision
Short and Long Sight
Squinting
Affections of the Ear
Inflammation of the Meatus
Wax in the Ear
Earache
Inflammation of the Tympanum, Deafness
Bleeding from the Nose
Ingrowing Toe Nail
Chafing and Excoriation
Foreign Substances
Bleeding from Wounds
Proud Flesh
Ambrine
Compression of Arteries to Stop the Flow of Blood
Anesthetics
Care of the Teeth
Rotting of the Teeth
Tooth-Ache
Filling Teeth
The First Teeth
Cleaning the Teeth
Ulcer of the Stomach
Glanders
X-Ray
Radium
Trachoma
Arterio-Sclerosis
Flatfoot
Riggs' Disease
Bandages

17.82 Cleaning the Teeth

Cleaning the Teeth.

THE most important rule to be observed in the preservation of the teeth is to keep them perfectly clean, and never to allow any foreign substance to remain on or about them. A decaying tooth should never be allowed to remain in the mouth; it causes others to decay.
If tartar has been allowed to collect, have it removed immediately. The teeth should be carefully and thoroughly brushed daily’ with warm mater, and the occasional use of a dentifrice that is impalpably fine, and that contains no acid.

A Brush has no bad effect upon the teeth, as some suppose, for the parts of the teeth most exposed to the friction of a brush axe never the first to begin to decay. This beginning of decay takes place in their depressed surfaces, and where they touch each other. A soft brush is better for the teeth than a stiff one, because the latter is apt to fret the gums, and cause them to recede, which gives the teeth a lengthened appearance.
Teeth in a crowded condition should never be filed, unless they begin to decay.

Tooth Picks, made of quill, or wood, or ivory, should be used after meals, and all particles of food lodged between the teeth should be removed.

In Sickness, the rules for cleanliness of the teeth should be more rigidly enforced than at any other time, as then they are more exposed to destructive agents, and are liable to participate in the general debility and disease of the system.

Influence of Diseased Teeth upon the Health.

The bad effects of a diseased and unclean mouth upon the general health are of more serious consequence than most people are aware. In twenty four hours, we breathe twenty thousand times; and what must be the effect upon the delicate structure of the lungs, when, for days, months and years, the air we breathe is drawn through a depository of filth, and is poisoned by being mixed with effluvia arising from decayed and diseased matter in the mouth. The intermittent fevers of the West are caused by the effluvia arising from the decaying matter of low grounds and marshes, which can hardly be more pernicious than the effluvia from the impurity and corruption generated in an unclean mouth, filled with decaying teeth. Dr. Hays says 11 no species of animal matter is so offensive to the health and vitality of the adjoining substance, whether nerve, or membrane, or any part or portion of the living body, as decaying bone."

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