Chapter 17 - Surgical Diseases
Modern Surgery
Inflammation
Suppuration and Abscess
Mortification
Pyaemia
Ulceration and Ulcers
Boils
Carbuncle
Malignant Pustule
Burns and Scalds
Frost Bite
Chilblains
Mechanical,Injuries
Septic Wounds
Incised Wounds
Rules for Examining and Dressing Wounds
Antiseptic Dressings
Way Wounds Unite
Punctured Wounds
Lacerated Wounds
Granulation and Scarification
Gunshot Wounds
Poisoned Wounds
Fractures
Way Broken Bones Unite
Dislocations
Different Diseases of Bones
Pereostitis
Necrosis
Coxalgia
White Swelling
Bunions
Whitlow
Stiff Joint
Tumors
Cancer
Polypus
Piles
Wens
Aneurisms
Bronchocele
Water in the Scrotum
Blood in the Scrotum
Phlebitis
Varicose Veins
Hernia
Varicocele
Deformities and Irritations of the Spine
Wry Neck
Foreign Bodies in the Eye
Stye
Inflammation of the Edge of the Eyelids
Disorder of the Lashes
Ptosis
Chronic Inflammation of the Lachrymal Sac
Opthalmia
Inflammation of the Cornea
Inflammation of the Iris
Weakness of Sight
Imperfect Vision
Short and Long Sight
Squinting
Affections of the Ear
Inflammation of the Meatus
Wax in the Ear
Earache
Inflammation of the Tympanum, Deafness
Bleeding from the Nose
Ingrowing Toe Nail
Chafing and Excoriation
Foreign Substances
Bleeding from Wounds
Proud Flesh
Ambrine
Compression of Arteries to Stop the Flow of Blood
Anesthetics
Care of the Teeth
Rotting of the Teeth
Tooth-Ache
Filling Teeth
The First Teeth
Cleaning the Teeth
Ulcer of the Stomach
Glanders
X-Ray
Radium
Trachoma
Arterio-Sclerosis
Flatfoot
Riggs' Disease
Bandages

17.89 Flatfoot

Flatfoot.
A N affection of one or both feet that is very often mistaken for rheumatism and treated with rheumatic remedies for a long time without relief, is flatfoot or broken arch. To obtain the strength necessary to enable the weight of the body to be carried in a light, graceful and easy manner, the foot is not placed entirely on the ground, but an are or arch is formed by the bones being held in a certain position by the ligaments. Rapid growth of fat with gain of weight, long standing on hard pavements, and much walking cause these ligaments to lose their efficiency and the arch gives away and flatfoot results, as in Figure 1.

The presence of flatfoot may be determined by wetting the sole of the foot and placing it on a dry planed board. The imprint will show the entire surface of the bottom of the foot, while if there is no flatfoot, the imprint will show only the toes, ball and heel of the foot, and the outer edge, the whole having the effect of a crescent, the arch as in Figure 2 not touching the board.

Symptoms. The symptoms of flatfoot are pain and tiredness any~ , where from the ankle to the hip. Great discomfort is felt if standing is continued over a great period of time. Possibly the pain is most severe in the calf and the big ligament at the back of the ankle. Symptoms are less pronounced in the morning, and in fact in early cases all of the pain will be felt on going to bed, and excepting for a sense of stiffness, the troubles will have disappeared until the causes are again at work.

Treatment. The simplest method of repairing a broken arch is by the use of pads made of some non absorbable material and with density enough to give support. Many times if the arch is properly supported it will regain its tone and the pad may be dispensed with. Metal plates are much better and are for sale at any first class shoe store.

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