Chapter 28 - Medicinals A - Z
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
V
W
Y
Z

28.22 W

Water Horehound (Fig. 240). This article has been described under Bugle Weed (Lycopus Virginicus). See Bugle Weed.

Water Pepper (Polygonum Punctatum). This annual plant is called smart weed, and grows throughout our country, in low grounds, and along ditches and brooks. It has a pungent, biting taste, and is stimulant, diuretic, emmenagogue, antiseptic, and vesicant. It is used in coughs, colds, gravel, and womb complaints. Preparations. Fluid extract, dose, ten to forty drops ; solid extract, dose, two to three grains ; tincture, four ounces to a pint of diluted alcohol, dose, half a dram to two drams; infusion, half an ounce to a pint of water, dose, half an ounce to an ounce.

Wahoo (Ruonymus Atropurpureus). A small shrub growing in woods in many parts of the United States. The bark of the root is a bitter tonic, laxative, alterative, diuretic, and expectorant, and is advantageously used in pulmonary affections, dropsy, constipation, torpidity of the liver, dyspepsia, and intermittent fevers. Preparations. Fluid extract, dose, one to two drams ; tincture, four ounces to twelve ounces of diluted alcohol, dose, half an ounce to an ounce.

Wax. The yellow and white wax are chiefly used as ingredients of plasters and ointments.

White Hellebore ( Veratrum Album). This is a European perennial plant, the root of which is a violent emetic and purgative, and in large doses is poisonous; not often used, except externally, in the form of ointment or decoction, for the cure of itch and some other skin diseases.

White Oak (Querous Alba). The inner bark of the white oak is astringent, tonic, and antiseptic, and has been used in intermittent fever, chronic diarrhea, chronic mucous discharges, and passive hemorrhages. As a wash applied externally it sometimes arrests night sweats, and as an astringent gargle and injection its use is common for relaxed palate, spongy gums, leucorrhea falling of the bowel, etc. Preparations. Fluid extract, dose half a dram to a dram; solid extract, dose, ten to fifteen grains; tincture, two ounces to a pint of diluted alcohol, dose, half an ounce to an ounce.

White Pond Lily (Nymphma Odorata). This grows in ponds and marshes in many parts of our country. The root is demulcent, anodyne, astringent, and alterative; used in dysentery, diarrhea, gonorrhea, whites, and scrofula. An infusion is sometimes used as a gargle in ulcers of the mouth and throat, and as an injection in leucorrhea. Dose of the infusion, from two to three fluid ounces.

Wild Cherry (Prunus Virginiana). This tree grows extensively in the American forests, flourishing where the soil is fertile and the climate temperate. The inner bark is tonic and stimulant to the digestive organs, and sedative to the nerves and the circulation. It is much used in consumption, scrofula, and dyspepsia. Preparations. Fluid extract, dose, two to three drams, compound fluid extract, dose, half a dram to a dram; infusion, half an ounce to a pint of water, dose, one ounce ; syrup, three ounces of fluid extract to thirteen ounces of simple syrup, dose, two dram to an ounce.

Wild Cucumber (Homordica Blaterium). This, sometimes called squirting cucumber, is a native of the south of Europe, and is cultivated in Great Britain. It is a powerful hydragogue cathartic, and in large doses causes nausea and vomiting. On account of the watery stools it produces it is much used in dropsical complaints, though the severity of its action forbids its being used alone. Dose, a quarter to half a grain, repeated every hour till it operates; of elaterin, from a sixteenth to a twentieth of a grain, given in solution.

Wild Ginger (Asarum Canadense). This is known by the names of coltsfoot and Canada snake root, and is common in all parts of the country. The root is tonic, stimulant, aromatic, expectorant, and diaphoretic. It is used in pains of the stomach, colic, etc. Dose of the powder, half a dram; of the tincture, half a dram to two drams.

Wild Indigo (Baptisia Tinctoria). This perennial shrub is found in most parts of the country. The bark of the root is purgative, emetic, stimulant, astringent, and antiseptic. It is chiefly used for its antiseptic properties. For external use it is valuable as a wash or gargle for various ulcers, mercurial sore mouth, and scrofulous and syphilitic ophthalmia. Preparations. Fluid extract, dose, a quarter to half a dram; tincture, two ounces to a pint of diluted alcohol, dose, two to four drams; infusion, dose, half an ounce; baptism, the active principle, a quarter to half a grain; gargle, four ounces of fluid extract to twelve ounces of water, to be used as occasion requires.



Wild Yam (Dioscorea Villosa). A perennial vine, found mostly at the South. The root is antispasmodic, and is successfully used in bilious colic. It is said to bring relief in the most violent cases of this complaint. It allays nausea and spasms during pregnancy. It is given in the form of decoction, two or three fluid ounces every thirty or forty minutes. Dose of the tincture, from a quarter of a dram to a dram; of dioscorein, the active principle, one to three grains.

Willow (Salix Alba). The willow is common in Europe and America. Its bark is tonic and astringent, and is used, occasionally, as a substitute for Peruvian bark in intermittent fever. It is also employed in the treatment of chronic diarrhea and dysentery. Dose of the powdered bark, one dram; of the decoction, one to two fluid ounces. Salicin, the active principle, is given, sometimes, in place of quinine; dose, from two to eight grains.

Wintergreen ( Gaultheria Procumbens). This evergreen grows in mountainous, barren regions, throughout our country. The leaves are an agreeable stimulant, aromatic and astringent. Used for chronic diarrhea, and as an emmenagogue. The oil and essence are useful in flatulent colic; dose of the oil, from five to eight drops, on sugar; of the essence, twenty to thirty drops. Much used to flavor other medicines.

Witch Hazel (Hamamelis Virginica). This derives its name from its having fruit and flowers together on the same tree. It is found in most parts of our country. The bark and leaves are tonic, astringent and sedative. It is used in bleeding from the lungs and stomach, and in diarrhea, dysentery, and excessive mucous discharges. It is also used in incipient consumption, and for sore mouth, etc. Preparations. Fluid extract, dose, one to two drams; infusion, dose, three drams; syrup, four ounces of fluid extract to twelve ounces of simple syrup, dose, one to two drams.



Wolfsbane (Aconitum Napellus). This has already been described under its other common name, which is monkshood. See , Monkshood " for its description.

Wormseed (Chenopodium Anthelminticum). This perennial is called Jerusalem oak , and is found in waste places all over the United States. An oil is extracted from the seeds, which, in doses of from three to five drops, morning and evening, for a child, destroys worms. A strong infusion of the tops has a similar effect. The remedy should be used four or five days, and be followed by a purge.



Wormwood (Artemisia Absinthium). The tops and leaves of this perennial are tonic and anathematic; used in intermittent fever, jaundice, and worms. It restores the appetite in a weakened state of the digestive organs, and is also useful in amenorrhea. It is excellent applied as a tincture, or in the form of fomentation, to bruises, sprains, and local inflammations. Preparations. Fluid extract, dose, one third to two thirds of a dram; solid extract, dose, three to five grains; tincture, two ounces to fourteen ounces of diluted alcohol, dose, two to three drams; syrup, two ounces fluid extract to six ounces of simple syrup, dose, one to two drams.

< Previous Sub-Category      Next Sub-Category >

Any statements made on this site have not been evaluated by the FDA and are not intended to diagnose, treat or cure any disease or condition. Always consult your professional health care provider.

copyright 2005, J. Crow Company, New Ipswich NH 03071

Privacy Policy for Household Physician

Email Us