Chapter 32 - Physical Culture
Physical Culture - Eugene Sandow portrait
Gymnastics
Dumb-bell Exercise
A Student of Physical Culture
Jiu-Jitsu
Jiu-Jitsu Lessons 1
Jiu-Jitsu Lessons 2
Jiu-Jitsu Lessons 3
Jiu-Jitsu Lessons 4
Jiu-Jitsu Lessons 5
Jiu-Jitsu Lessons 6
Jiu-Jitsu Lessons 7
Jiu-Jitsu Lessons 8
Jiu-Jitsu Lessons 9
Jiu-Jitsu Lessons 10
Jiu-Jitsu Lessons 11
Jiu-Jitsu Lessons 12
Bed Gymnastics
The Whitely Exerciser

32.3 Dumb-bell Exercise

Lo unose, uiien, wiio say u ey.Liave no ui me ior exercisel we iiearuiiy recommend our home lessons, which, in connection with a daily walk will be just exactly what is required to secure physical perfection and muscular strength, without putting yourself to but very little trouble to attai i it. Ten or fifteen minutes daily, morning and evenÂing, or to suit convenience it may not be so divided, but may all be taken in the morning, or all in the evening, will, in connection with walking, keep the muscular system in perfect condition, and thus insure perfect bodily health. Exercise should never be taken immediately after a plentiful meal, nor should it be taken to excess, particularly during hot weather. In the former case too much cerebral influence for the time being exÂpended in muscular action, the amount of it conveyed to the stomach is insufficient for the laborious function that viscus has to perform, and indigestion is the consequence. It is possible to fatigue the body beyond a proper point, in which case repose becomes necessary; but this is a rare occurrence compared with the instances of insufficient exercise, or where the mind is stretched beyond its natural power to bear, by the ambitious student, the covetous and careworn merchant. All persons of both sexes, and of every age, who are possessed of average vitality, should, in the department of physical education, employ light apparatus, and execute a great variety of feats, which require skill, accuracy, courage, dash, presence of mind, quick eye and hand, in brief, which demands a vigorous and complete exerÂcise of all the powers and faculties with which the Creator has enÂdowed us. The following dumb bell exercise will prove a tremendous advanÂtage, perfect development and good health. In no case should the pupil bend the legs at the knee, or his arms at the elbow, unless it is so directed. No rule in the dumb bell exÂercises is so important as this. If it be forgotten, exercises with dumb bells will lose more than half their value. No. 1. The position is shown in Fig. 1. Thumbs outward. Bells exactly horizontal. Turn the thumb ends of the bells to the hips, and then back again to the position shown in the figure. Repeat ten times. Let the change be made with the greatest accuracy. Men it is well done, no matter which end is at the hip, a straight rod run through one dumb bell, lengthwise, would at the same time run through the centre of the other. In this and all subsequent dumb bell exercises, the pupil must be careful not to bend the elbows. Men exceptions to this rule occur, they will be plainly indicated. No. 2. Position seen Fig. 2. Keep the elbows pressed against the sides and twist the bells so the ends are exactly reversed. Be sure they are exactly in line with each other, and the forearms parÂallel. Repeat ten times.

No. 3. In passing from No. 2 to No. 3, bring the bells to the chest, and on the next beat to the position in Fig. 3. The palms of the hands are upward. Bells exactly horizontal and parallel to each other. Turn the hands over, knuckles upward. Bells now exactly in the same position as before. Repeat ten times.

No. 4. In passing from No. 3 to No. 4, bring the bells to the chest, and OD the next beat to the position in Fig. 4. The palms forward,Twist the bells so the knuckles are forward. Repeat ten times. Arms to be kept parallel from first to last. No. 5. Position as in Fig. 5. In passing from No. 4 to No. 5, bring the bells to the chest. Twist the arms so that the bells are exactly reversed. It will be seen in the figure, the palms are upward. When the bells are reversed, the knuckles are upward. Keep the arms parallel. Repeat ten times. In passing from one exercise to another, I have spoken of bringing the bells to the chest. They should strike the chest exactly at the point shown in Fig. 6.

No. 6. Thrust the two bells down by the side of the legs. Bring to the chest, and thrust them sideways. Bring to the chest and thrust them upward. Bring to the chest and thrust them forward. Repeat these four thrusts five times. When the down thrust is made, the pupil must be careful that at the lowest point the bells are precisely horizontal, and parallel to each other. When the side thrust is made, the arms must be horizontal, the bells perpendicular and parallel to each other. When the upward thrust i . made, the arms must be accurately perpendicular, bells parallel and horizontal. When the forward thrust is executed, the arms must be exactly liorizontal, and the bells perpendicular and parallel. No. 7. Raise the right hand bell from the side of the leg into the arm pit, five times. (Fig. 7.) Left, five times. Alternately and simultaneously, five times. Be sure that each time when the beils ome into the arm pits they are exactly horizontal. No. 8. Passing from No. 7 to No. 8, bring the bells to the chest; on the next beat to the top of the shoulders; on the next beat carry up the right, reaching accurately the position seen in Fig. 8. Repeat ftk iimes. Left the same. Alternately and simultaneously, each five times,

No. 9. Passing from No. 8 to No. 9, bring the bells to the chest (the dotted lines in Fig. 9 show it), then down by the sides; in all, as usual, keeping good time to the music. Now carry the right bell

to the chest, then up, reaching the position shown in Fig. 9. Return to the hip, marking one beat on the chest in going down. Repeat ten times. Left, the same. Alternately and simultaneously, ten times. No. 10. Bring the bells to the chest. Strike out the right one in front, arm precisely horizontal, bell perpendicular. (Fig. 10.) Re peat twenty times. Left, the same. Alternately and simultaneously, twenty times. As usual, keep the chest well forward, and the shoulders drawn far back. No. 11. Holding the bells in the position seen in Fig. 11, bring them with great force into the positiori seen in the dotted line, forty times. In beginning this elbow thrust backward, it is well to first raise the bells a foot, that they may be brought back with more force, and more directly into the position seen in the dotted lines. But in carrying them forward again, it should be first into the position seen in the figure.

No. 12. Stamp the left foot, then the right, then charge out into the position seen in Fig. 12. Make sure that the leg behind, in this and all subsequent charges, is kept entirely straight, while the one forward is placed as shown in the figure. Holding the arms as illusÂtrated, force the entire person into the position of the dotted lines, five times. There should be no motion in the shou der joints. The chest is pushed far forward, and the shoulders drawn uell back . These directions are applicable to all charging exercises, in which a different course is not plainly inclicated. It will be observed that the charge in No. 12 is exactly sideways. Rise to the perpendicular again, stamp with the right foot, then the left, and lastly charge out on the left side, and repeat the performÂance of the right side fl.ve times. No. 13. Rise to the perpendicular, stamp with the left foot, then with the right, then charge out as shown in Fig. 13. Under the directions given in No. 12, sink five times, same on the left side, of course with the intermediate stamping. No. 14. After the regular stamping, the pupil should charge in the manner illustrated in Fig. 14. Sink five times. Same on the left side. ln this, as in Figs. 12 and 13, the charging is exactly sideways.

No. 15. Stand upright, hands by the side. Raise the right hand, as shonvn in Fig. 15, five times. Left, the same. Alternately and sirriultaneously, five times.

in this the arm is carried up with a quick, strong effort, and arÂrested at the horizontal line, precisely as if it had struck a rock. NVhen it is brought back to the side again, it is with the same force and sudden arrest. This and the next one are among the most severe of the dumb bell exercises. No. 16. Assuming the position seen in Fig. 16, force back the right arm, as seen in the dotted line, five times. Left the same. AlÂternately and simultaneously, five times. The arm must not be bent at the elbow. The directio,.is given in No. 15, in regard to force and sudden arrest, are applicable to this exercise.

No. 17. Beginning as in No. 15, with the arms hanging, combine the two exercises, Nos. 15 and 16, in one sweep, reaching the posi

tion of the dotted line in Fig. 17. Repeat five times. Left hand the same. Alternately and simultaneously, five times. No. 18. Stand upright, arms hanging. Raise the right arm to the horizontal, at the side ' with the palm up. Repeat five times. Left, the Same. Alternately and simultaneously, five times. The position of one of the arms is seen in Fig. 17. No. 19. Having the arms extended at the sides as shown in Fig. 18, raise the right arm to the position seen in the dotted line, five times. Left, the same. Alternately and simultaneously, five times. In raising the dumb bells over the head, be careful that they are in such a position that, when the two are up together, they are exactly horizontal and parallel to each other. No. 20. Beginning as in No. 18, arms hanging, combine Nos. 17 and 18, in one sweep, each arm five times. Alternately and simulÂtaneously, the same.

No. 21. Standing upright, arms hanging, charge into the position shown in Fig. 19; remaining thus, thrust the arms in front, in a horizontal line, five times, alternately and simultaneously. Rising to the perpendicular, stamp with the right foot, then the left, then charge out with the left foot, and repeat the exercises with the arms. It will be seen by the figure that the leg behind is kept entirely straight and rests on the toe. The special point in this exercise is to reach the dumb bell as far forward as possible. No. 22. Standing as represented in Fig. 20, force the right arm into the position shown in the dotted line, five times. Left the same. Alternately and simultaneously, five times. In this exercise keep the body as erect as possible. No. 23. Having the arms perpendicular over the head, perform the same exercise as in the last number, with right hand, left hand, then alternately and simultaneouslv.

No. 24. Placing the feet in position ~f Fig. 21, raise the arms with great force from the hanging position to that seen in Fig. 21. On the next beat bring the arms to the position seen in Fig. 22; on the next to that seen in Fig. 23; on the next beat sweep back to the position seen in Fig. 22; then to the position seen in Fig. 21. Repeat five times. Stamp right and lef t, then step out with the lef t f oot, then swing the arms over the head, performing the same exercise on the left side. In this exercise neither arms nor legs should be bent. No. 25. Stand erect, arms horizontal in front and parallel to each other. Carry the right hand backward in the horizontal plane (Fig. 24) as f ar as possible; return it. Repeat ten times. Lef t the same; alternately and simultaneously, ten times.

No. 26. Standing erect, arms hanging, stamp with the lef t f oot; then with the right; then charge into the position seen in Fig. 25, and thrust the arms in a direct line upward, alternately and simulÂtaneously, ten times. Assuming the erect position, drop the arms by tjie side, stamp the right f oot, then the lef t, and charge out on the left side; repeat the exercise with the arms. In this exercise, it will be seen, the leg behind is straight, that charged forward, considerably bent. No. 27. As in nearly all other exercises, begin with the heels

together, bo dy erect, chest forward, shoulders back, arms hanging, dumb bells horizontal and parallel to each other. Step diagonally

backward with the right foot, as seen in Fig. 26, and repeat the exercises in No. 26. Same with the left foot. In this exercise the forward leg is kept straight, that behind is bent as much as possible. No. 28. Bells on the chest. Carry the right arm out at the side, thrusting it as far back as possible; suddenly bring it back to the chest in a circle as if grasping a large body standing in front. Repeat five times. Left hand, same. Alternately and simultaneously, same. In this exercise the arms should be kept in the horizontal plane, and should in the performance of the exercise enclose as large an armful of the imaginary objects as possible. No. 29. Standing erect, arms hanging at the side, suddenly turning the body to one side as far as you can twist it with out moving the feet, carry the arms to the position seen in Fig. 27. Bring them back to the sides, while at the same time you bring the body to the first position. Swing the arms up on the other side, and so continue, alternating twenty times. No. 30. Standing erect, arms hanging, bring the bells to the chest, then to tho floor, as shown in the dotted line in Fig. 28; then rising, bring the dumb bells again to the chest, and on the next beat thrust them as far upward as possible, rising on the toes; then back to the chest. Repeat twenty times.

No. 31. Standing erect, dumb bells oii the shoulders (not on the chest), thrust the right arm out at the side as seen in F~q. 29, ten times. Left, the same. Alternately and simultaneously, the same. No. 32. Standing erect, arms hanging, carry the arms to the hori zontal in front; then to the position over the head seen in Fig. 30; now down to the horizontal again, and then to the floor as seen in the dotted line. Repeat ten times. In this exercise there must be no bending at the knees or elbows. No. 33. Standing erect, arms hanging, charge out with the right

foot, and sweep the left arm as shown in Fig. 31; on the next beat return to the first position. Repeat five times. Same on the left side. Alternately, five times. No. 34. Standing erect, arms hanging, withoutmoving the body, carry the right foot out sideways, lifting it from the floor, and bringÂing it back to the other foot, without bending the knee, five times; then charge into the position seen in Fig. 32, and return to the first position, five times. The arm which is brought over the head must be carried in a direct line from the side to the position over the head, and not brought toward the front of the body in its passage up or down.

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