Chapter 4 - Skin Diseases
Introduction to Skin Diseases
Congestive Inflammation of the Skin
Measles
Scarlet Fever
Smallpox Vaccination
Smallpox Illustration
Smallpox Variola
Varioloid
Chicken Pox
Image of Erysipelas & Inflammatory Blush
Cow Pox
Erysipelas
Nettle Rash
Rose Rash
Inflammatory Blush
Watery Pimples
Eczema and Salt Rheum
Shingles
Itch
Rupia
Pemphigus
Mattery Pimples
Crusted Tetter
Papulous Scall
Scaly Eruptions
Leprosy
Psoriasis
Pityriasis
Dry Pimples
Lupus
Warts and Corns
Mother's Marks
Nerves of the Skin
Color of the Skin
Disorders of the Sweat Glands
Disorders of the Oil Glands and Tubes
Barber's Itch
Disorders of the Hair and Tubes
Lice
BedBugs
Freckles
Corns
Bunions
Dandruff
Baldness
Gypsy Moth and Brown Tail Moth
Red Nose

4.32 Mother's Marks

Mother's Marks. Naevus.

THE, small vessels of the skin, called capillaries, suffer certain alterations of structure which pass under the name of mother's marks. These marks are simply a great dilatation of these minute blood vessels. They vary in size from a mere point to a patch of several inches square.
The smallest of all is the spider mark. It is a small red point, from which several little straggling vessels spread out on all sides. Sometimes this is of the size and appearance of a red currant; at other times, of a strawberry or raspberry; and occasionally it is even much larger, and is compared to a lobster.
When the circulation is active through them, or the individual is excited by exercise, or by moral causes, these marks are of a bright red color. Some are naturally livid and dark colored, and look like blackberries, and black currants. The blueness of these is owing to the vessels being still more stretched and dilated, and to the consequent slower passage of the blood though them, which gives more time for its change from the arterial red to the venous blue.

Treatment. If the mark is not making progress, it had better be let alone, or only subjected to gentle pressure by putting a piece of soap plaster over it. When its course is threatening mischief, it is sometimes cured by penciling a small portion of its surface, from time to time, with nitric acid. They maybe operated on with safety by electrolysis and other methods.

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