Chapter 5 - Diseases of the Brain and Nerves
A Picture of Perfect Health - Diagram
Muscles of the Neck and Face - Diagram 1
Muscles of the Neck and Face - Diagram 2
Internal View of Base of Cranium - Diagram
Cross-section of Head - Diagram
Base of the Brain - Diagram
Cross-section of Head - Diagram
View of Skull - Diagram
Introduction to Diseases of the Brain and Nerves
Inflammation of the Dura Mater
Inflammation of the Arachnoid and Pia Mater
Brain Fever
Softening of the Brain
Abscess of the Brain
Induration of the Brain
Tumors of the Brain
Delirium Tremens
Inebriety
Effects of Alcohol on Stomach and Kidneys - Diagram
Effects of Alcohol on Stomach and Kidneys
Enlargement of the Brain
Shrinking of the Brain
Water in the Head
Dropsy of the Brain
CerebroSpinal Fever
Diseases of the Spinal Cord
Inflammation of the Spinal Cord
Apoplexy
Sunstroke
Paralysis
Paralysis of One Side of the Body
Paralysis of Lower Part of the Body
Local Palsy
Shaking Palsy
Lead Palsy
Hydrophobia
Muscular and Nervous Derangements from Wounds
Locked Jaw
Epilepsy
Catalepsy
St. Vitus' Dance
Chronic Chorea
Cramps
Pains of Nerves
Tic Douloureux
Hemicrania
Sciatica
Insanity
Melancholy
Monomania
Mania
Dementia
Idiocy
Hypochondria
Hiccough
Fainting
Dizziness of the Head
Nightmare
Headaches
Locomotor Ataxia
Neurasthenia
Neuritis

5.30 Paralysis

Palsy. Paralysis.

PALSY is a loss of the power of voluntary motion and feeling, one or both coming on, sometimes gradually, but more often suddenly, and extending at one time to a part, at another time to the whole body. It is a kind of station house on the way to apoplexy, where passengers stop, not merely to stay over night, but to rest many days, or even years.
A great injury inflicted upon the brain, either by pressure or other cause, will induce a complete loss of motion and feeling, and this ex. tending to the whole structure, brings likewise a loss of consciousness, which is apoplexy. A smaller degree of pressure, or a less injury upon the same brain, would occasion a loss of motion only, or, if a loss of feeling were experienced also, it would only extend to a part of the body, and consciousness would remain. This would be palsy. The disease is like apoplexy in kind, but stops short of it in degree.

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